"The birthright to confusion" a new academic benchmark

On the 27th November 2015 Storygardenz and Tuscia University set a new academic benchmark: “The Birthright to Confusion”

Without prior notification, and for the first time ever, 50 young students preparing to enter university were confronted with a test in which they were required to prove their incapacity to understand, or rather , their capacity not to understand. 

In this they were assisted by a seminar, which was entirely incomprehensible, touching upon themes such as truth, depth, air currents, palindromes, oliphants, graals, covenants with gods, fissures in the earth, tambourine men and the hero’s journey. In their final reports, some students broke the moulds of their accustomed thinking.

Here is an example of a themes and a student report.

THEME (concerning the Coriolis effect). Science ascribes this strange phenomenon to the rotation of the Earth, which causes a rightward (clockwise) deflection, setting up a cyclonic (counterclockwise) circulation of air and water around the hurricane belt. Question: how come words are also affected? Why do stories - and sometimes even history - move anti-clockwise in the northern hemisphere and clockwise in the southern hemisphere?  

REPORT (concerning the Hero’s Journey by Patrick Sala) “Our ancestors told us that, once upon a time we landed here as alien creatures, without a single idea and with no direction…. Then, in the course of time and many life journeys, some spontaneous combustion began to light the way …… many dots like stars lighting the way … until some creatures went beside themselves and tried to save the destiny of the others.”

Attending the event,: Bernard Anson (DADO), Prof. Riccardo Salvati (Tuscia University), Prof.Maria Teresa Recchia, Prof Annarita Sbardella, Prof. Vittorio Lecce (all from the Liceo Scientifico Leonardo da Vinci di Sora - FR), Dott. Stefano Gavotti (agronomist from FAO), Michele Sacco and Raul Deveze (Mexico City) jazz musicians. 

“the birthright to confusion” (Anson)

“the birthright to confusion” (Anson)

“observing the Coriolis effect” (Anson and Salvati)

“observing the Coriolis effect” (Anson and Salvati)

Graals

Graals

Mr. Tambourine Man

Mr. Tambourine Man